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  • 04.06.2013

Anette

PressreleaseBarometer

June 4, 2013-Brussels

The European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) is using the run up to next week’s Velo-city 2013, its international cycling conference in Vienna, to launch a groundbreaking new benchmarking report which provides a multi-dimensional view on cycling in all 27 EU countries.

Remarkably Netherlands and Denmark were inseparable at the top of the table after assessing daily cycling levels, cycle tourism, advocacy activity, bicycle sales and cyclists’ safety.  Countries in the south and east of Europe showed they have a lot of potential for improvement.

ECF Cycling Barometer Project Manager Chloe Mispelon said “The main purpose of launching the ECF Cycling Barometer today is to get people talking about international comparisons in cycling. We are constantly asked which countries in Europe are ‘best for cycling’. The ECF Cycling Barometer is our way of prompting a debate around five dimensions of cycling we are prioritising.

We are confident in our results which show a strong correlation with other data and knowledge about cycling but we call on the EU Horizon 2020 research program to establish data that is updated and maintained through to 2020. The barometer shows that we really need reliable statistics on cycling in the EU to enable governments and advocates to assess progress on cycling and to allow collaborative working between countries to improve cycling for European citizens.”

Up to now, it was considered difficult to compare European countries and the state of their cycling across numerous fields. Different national statistics and lack of data make it hard to be certain about the cycling record of each country. Uniquely the ECF Cycling Barometer took five verifiable EU-wide surveys and therefore eliminated different treatments given to cycling in EU member states. The countries are then given points according to their rank in each field and all points are summed to get a final score.

ECF Secretary General Bernhard Ensink said “This is a valuable analysis carried out by our ECF staff working across several disciplines. Now the advocacy community and our partners can use this to press governments for real, measurable change. If we are to double cycling in Europe it is also vital for the EU to use this data and develop it to show where strategic investments, structural funds and research funding must be focused in coming years.”

The results are:

Rank

Country

Score

 

Rank

Country

Score

 

Rank

Country

Score

1=

Denmark

125

 

10

UK

80

 

19

Luxembourg

52

Netherlands

125

 

11

France

78

 

20=

Poland

47

3

Sweden

119

 

12

Slovenia

77

 

Lithuania

47

4

Finland

114

 

13

Czech Republic

69

 

22

Cyprus

41

5

Germany

105

 

14

Ireland

65

 

23=

Portugal

36

6

Belgium

100

 

15=

Estonia

56

 

Spain

36

7

Austria

95

 

Italy

56

 

25

Bulgaria

30

8

Hungary

91

 

17=

Latvia

54

 

26

Romania

30

9

Slovakia

88

 

Greece

54

 

27

Malta

15

 

 

—ends—

 

Notes to the editor: 

About the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF)

With over 70 members across nearly 40 countries, the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) unites cyclist’ associations from across the globe, giving them a voice on the international level. Our aim is to get more people cycling more often by influencing policy in favour of cycling.

 ECF’s members are complemented by networks Scientists for Cycling, Cities for Cycling and the ECF Cycling Industry Club.

 

Velo-city 2013 Vienna

Velo-city is the world’s premier cycling conference series attracting a global audience of policy makers, advocates and academics.

The 2013 Velo-city will take place in Vienna from 11th-14th June 2013. Over 1000 attendees will hear from nearly 200 speakers include EU Transport Commissioner Sim Kallas and 15 City Mayors.

 ECF Cycling Barometer Content

A technical note explaining the source of the data used for the ECF Cycling Barometer can be found here: http://www.ecf.com/wp-content/uploads/ECF-cycling-barometer-2013-technical-document.pdf

Photographs and infographics can be found here: http://www.ecf.com/wp-content/uploads/ECF-Barometer-Visualization.png  and  here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/eucyclistsfed/sets/72157630222767986/ 

 

Press Contact

Chloe Mispelon c.mispelon@ecf.com +32 2 880 92 81 

  • Guest

    Hungary with a higher modal share than Denmark? And Slovenia sell a lot of bikes! http://www.ecf.com/wp-content/uploads/ECF-cycling-barometer-2013-technical-document.pdf

  • Jorge Coelho

    Great work guys! Obivously there are limitations, but somewere along the line such work has to start-off and its a good manner to press for more research.
    The only major remark I could make is in regards to the potencial sense of challenge that such studies can set. I believe that if we could deliver information regarding each country’s change performance over given periods, the group of countries that are worst ranked would quickly start to compete between each other. Otherwise, what we’ve seen over the last decades, will continue… some sort of helplessness keeps settled in.
    Keep up the good work!

  • Vieras

    Finland? Safe yes, comfortable absolutely not, with most cycle paths multi-use paths (shared with people taking the dog for a leak) featuring steep bends that force a stop in intersections even on green light.

  • Carlos Vieira

    Unfortunately my country (Portugal) is pathetic. Best climate in Europe and worst mentality… Highest number of cardiovascular diseases in Europe and still we just can’t lift our sorry asses from the car seat….

    • disqus_DT5XuMCXz3

      not sure if it’s the best climate for cycling. during the summer it’s too hot and dry, not very pleasant for cycling. also, the hilly relief of many cities and the cobblestone pavements do not help much. of course the major problems are the perception of cycling as a low-status activity, and the murderous behaviour of car drivers.

  • ciberian

    Good job, congratulations! About advocay, here in Spain it is having an important time, despite the fact that it is taking place out of the ECF.

  • Sturmbock

    “Guest • 5 days ago−

    Hungary with a higher modal share than Denmark? And Slovenia sell a lot of bikes!

    http://www.ecf.com/wp-content/uploads/ECF-cycling-barometer-2013-technical-document.pdf

    In Hungary there is a lot of poor people, and they have not any car or motorcycles. In little villages they have to use bicycles. They don’t want to use them, they not love cycling, but they have to, if they want to go to the shop, etc. Denmark and Hungary are not comparable.

  • Zalan Kemeny

    In Hungary our bike to work campaign and the critical mass events are really powerful and successful. Don’t think that we bike, because we are poor. The country is wealthier than Romania or Bulgaria, but you can see where they rank. So do not spoil the results of our many years’ effort!!
    i bike to work to a multinational company, because it is fun sport!

  • Peter Vintner

    Interesting list but of doubtful value, except for “top trumps” fans.
    Italy being so far down this list can only be accounted or by the facts that so many ride old and cheap bikes, “advocacy” is almost non-existent and government statistics are notoriously unreliable (if they even exist). Italy, like France, is a bike-mad country, especially for recreation. Go to towns like Ferrara or Mantova where the bicycle is a preferred form of transport. All over the North-East of Italy very many kids still go to school by bike, as they have done for decades.

    In Italian towns it isn’t so unusual to see people going to the shops by bike – including and especially old people.

    • Susanna Di Benedetto

      What if you move to South of Italy? Statistics are not about the North-East of Italy, but about Italy.

Last Updated June 26, 2013